Fashion Designer Sayaka Davis draws inspiration from women, art, and music that meets her mood.

"Having meditative and refreshing moments and experiences is important to keep dreaming and creating. One of my favorites is a Japanese tea ceremony that I go to every week. It's quiet and subtle and allows deep moments that I enjoy. Also I love traveling. In the coming months, maybe next year, my plan is to meet alpacas and do some sailing! " ...Sayaka Davis 

Sayaka Davis first studied fashion at Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo and subsequently worked as a knitwear designer for two Japanese companies.  In 2009 Sayaka moved to New York City where she worked for United Bamboo.  In the Fall/Winter of 2013, SAYAKA DAVIS launched her first collection.  It was a capsule collection, featuring 9 garments (mostly knits) and 7 jewelry pieces. The inspiration was Georgia O'Keeffe, the artist herself, and the expression of the women and color Amedeo Modigliani painted. Sayaka was imagining something deep and dark, but warm. Warm beige, reddish brown, deep green, and warm gray were blended together with soft and textured mohair, alpaca, and wool – natural fibers. And as a contrast, the jewelry was made with sharp and sculptural shapes. 

Sayaka Davis first studied fashion at Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo and subsequently worked as a knitwear designer for two Japanese companies.  In 2009 Sayaka moved to New York City where she worked for United Bamboo. 

In the Fall/Winter of 2013, SAYAKA DAVIS launched her first collection.  It was a capsule collection, featuring 9 garments (mostly knits) and 7 jewelry pieces. The inspiration was Georgia O'Keeffe, the artist herself, and the expression of the women and color Amedeo Modigliani painted. Sayaka was imagining something deep and dark, but warm. Warm beige, reddish brown, deep green, and warm gray were blended together with soft and textured mohair, alpaca, and wool – natural fibers. And as a contrast, the jewelry was made with sharp and sculptural shapes. 

JH: We are very excited to introduce your collection to our customers this season. Please describe your vision for your FALL 2016 collection. SD: This season, the woman we imagine is feminine with a hint of surreality. Early 20th century icon Lee Miller is a central inspiration, being the type of woman who could succeed as an actress, model, and photographer, living on the very edge of her time while managing to be both feminine and adventurous. To explore this theme more fully, we reflect on women’s styles of the roaring 1920’s and how they were simultaneously daring and refined for the first time in modern history. In order to express this kind of femininity, fine materials are carefully chosen: ultra-soft cashmere, snuggly mohair, rich baby alpaca, beautiful fine gauge knits, luxurious draped velvet and silk, light and soft cotton, super-fine wool melton and twill; all to give you comfort and elegance. The silhouette and volume is fitted, curved, gathered and yet also flow-y in ways that highlight the contrast between feminine elegance and cool, dreamlike movement. The color palette reinforces this vision: rust, snowy light gray, pale blue, navy, white, and ivory are combined to further achieve this contrast.

JH: We are very excited to introduce your collection to our customers this season. Please describe your vision for your FALL 2016 collection.

SD: This season, the woman we imagine is feminine with a hint of surreality. Early 20th century icon Lee Miller is a central inspiration, being the type of woman who could succeed as an actress, model, and photographer, living on the very edge of her time while managing to be both feminine and adventurous. To explore this theme more fully, we reflect on women’s styles of the roaring 1920’s and how they were simultaneously daring and refined for the first time in modern history. In order to express this kind of femininity, fine materials are carefully chosen: ultra-soft cashmere, snuggly mohair, rich baby alpaca, beautiful fine gauge knits, luxurious draped velvet and silk, light and soft cotton, super-fine wool melton and twill; all to give you comfort and elegance. The silhouette and volume is fitted, curved, gathered and yet also flow-y in ways that highlight the contrast between feminine elegance and cool, dreamlike movement. The color palette reinforces this vision: rust, snowy light gray, pale blue, navy, white, and ivory are combined to further achieve this contrast.

JH: What inspires your collection each season? SD: I always pay attention to mood and colors that I am feeling at the moment to explore. Each season I get inspiration from women, art, and music that matches the mood that I’m feeling. It is not that I am re-creating whoever or whatever I was inspired by. I like to write my own story.

JH: What inspires your collection each season?

SD: I always pay attention to mood and colors that I am feeling at the moment to explore. Each season I get inspiration from women, art, and music that matches the mood that I’m feeling. It is not that I am re-creating whoever or whatever I was inspired by. I like to write my own story.

JH: Tell us about your customer, the woman wearing your designs? SD: She dresses for herself to enjoy ~ She enjoys just being herself.

JH: Tell us about your customer, the woman wearing your designs?

SD: She dresses for herself to enjoy ~ She enjoys just being herself.

SD:  We show our collection in NY, Paris, and Tokyo. Our woven pieces and jewelry are made in NYC. I like to communicate very closely. The knits are made in China, using knitting techniques that are rarely done. And we just started Japanese production as well. We are proud of the high standards of our team. The important thing is to have a matching standard and vision, and share our passion with our factories. I believe that contributes to the face and the energy of the products. 

SD:  We show our collection in NY, Paris, and Tokyo. Our woven pieces and jewelry are made in NYC. I like to communicate very closely. The knits are made in China, using knitting techniques that are rarely done. And we just started Japanese production as well. We are proud of the high standards of our team. The important thing is to have a matching standard and vision, and share our passion with our factories. I believe that contributes to the face and the energy of the products. 

JH: What would you like to design that you have not done yet? SD: My passion is knitting. I love creating textiles. We envision launching a knitted home goods line in the future.  JH: What is your specific signature that differentiates your brand and is unique to you?   I love the aesthetic of authentic Japanese art, “Yohaku no bi”, beauty of the remaining white. Designing unfilled space. It is minimal yet exciting. My core elements are something organic and the unusual, and it probably comes from my roots. I like to make harmony by combining the minimal with excitement.  

JH: What would you like to design that you have not done yet?

SD: My passion is knitting. I love creating textiles. We envision launching a knitted home goods line in the future. 

JH: What is your specific signature that differentiates your brand and is unique to you?  

I love the aesthetic of authentic Japanese art, “Yohaku no bi”, beauty of the remaining white. Designing unfilled space. It is minimal yet exciting. My core elements are something organic and the unusual, and it probably comes from my roots. I like to make harmony by combining the minimal with excitement.  

SD: We have been doing mostly costume jewelry, but I’ve always wanted to make fine jewelry with stones. Historically and culturally, stones have been associated with magical powers. From 17SS, our newest collection, we shifted our focus to fine jewelry from costume jewelry, as we were always aiming to.  We are also thinking to collaborate with artists for future collections’ prints. It's very exciting!

SD: We have been doing mostly costume jewelry, but I’ve always wanted to make fine jewelry with stones. Historically and culturally, stones have been associated with magical powers. From 17SS, our newest collection, we shifted our focus to fine jewelry from costume jewelry, as we were always aiming to. 

We are also thinking to collaborate with artists for future collections’ prints. It's very exciting!

SD: Nature. Art. Pure creation. Types of design outside of fashion, like architecture gives me inspiration.  JH: Your thoughts on 2016...and onward. SD: The world is always changing. Brick & mortar and e-commerce have different roles, I think. I find it efficient to use e-commerce for certain things for my own time management. But brick & mortar can be very creative to have, and, in fashion, something that e-commerce cannot completely replace. Because a physical store is where you can actually see, touch, feel, and communicate. The world is always changing, and people’s needs are always changing, too. Fashion is about entertainment and dreams, so we want to think about how best to share with people. For more information contact on the latest news from Sayaka Davis and her newest arrivals, contact jill@purethread.com.

SD: Nature. Art. Pure creation. Types of design outside of fashion, like architecture gives me inspiration. 

JH: Your thoughts on 2016...and onward.

SD: The world is always changing. Brick & mortar and e-commerce have different roles, I think. I find it efficient to use e-commerce for certain things for my own time management. But brick & mortar can be very creative to have, and, in fashion, something that e-commerce cannot completely replace. Because a physical store is where you can actually see, touch, feel, and communicate. The world is always changing, and people’s needs are always changing, too. Fashion is about entertainment and dreams, so we want to think about how best to share with people.

For more information contact on the latest news from Sayaka Davis and her newest arrivals, contact jill@purethread.com.